2 out of 3 Canadians: Lack of Sexual Consent, Pornography, and Sex Trafficking

I have volunteered to help out abused women before; I have a history of being physically, verbally, and sexually assaulted; and, this is why I was not surprised when I read online that 2 out of 3 Canadians do not know what sexual consent means.

I wanted to know why they did not knew about this simple task so I goggled it online. According to HuffingtonPost article, “Two Reasons Canadians Are Confused About Sexual Consent”, which is written by Diane Hill, most Canadians don’t know about sexual consent because of Sexism and Silence. This article further states the following:

They still think “real” men should aggressively pursue sex and “good” women should resist (and eventually give in).

Aggressive behaviour (by men or usual offenders) and resistance (by women or usual victims) are characteristics of rape not sex. Again, I am not surprised to read the implication that most Canadians see sex as rape.

The above article misses the role of porn in creating aggressive behaviour. Porn is actually a much loved concept among Canadians, which is hilarious given how shy and reserved most Canadians appear. I find it shocking to see that most Canadians are heading that way while not attempting to learn about the actual fun associated with courting, obtaining sexual consent, and then forming and maintaining a real relationship.

Pornhub receives over 3.7 million unique visitors in Canada per month, which accounts for 10.6% of the country, and that’s just one porn site! So clearly, there’s a bit of underreporting going on when it comes to Canadians denying their own love of porn. Source: “Canadians Love to Pretend They Don’t Watch Porn” by Justin Ling.

Just one porn site, Pornhub, receives 10.6% of the Canadian population. I realize why some men at one of my previous workplaces were talking about porn so openly—obviously, I moved away from that office pretty soon. So what exactly is pornography doing to change sexual behaviour and harm the partner/spouse? According to Brian Mcneill’s article “How pornography influences and harms sexual behaviour” males who watched porn visualized pornographic images during sex on purpose. OK! If you are experiencing porn and not sex during sexual encounters, then how are you going to read your partner well? How are you going to tell that you are hurting your partner or just having fun?

Furthermore, I think that if pornography is twisting men’s behaviour, then it can cause rape really easily. For example, some porn involves intimate acts after listening to just a little bit of conversation that is not always considered romantic. Correct! If you study a rapist up close, you will see that he/she acts the same way.

We found that exposure to pornography increased dart throwing at human faces, which is correlated with aggressive tendencies….In particular, viewing violent pornography can increase males’ subsequent aggressive behaviour because it portrays a male’s coercive and aggressive behavior against a female victim as being a reward. Source: “Effects of Exposure to Pornography on Male Aggressive Behavioral Tendencies” by Dong-ouk Yang and Gahyun Youn.

Now think about this! Most Canadians are busy watching porn, which is what’s skewing their behaviour. Men are learning to be more aggressive and thus most women have learned to walk away. I have even met some Canadian women who do not want to have any sort of relationship with men due to their history of abuse. So if there are more and more Canadian women who are like this, then obviously men are watching more and more porn. But, that might be adding more force inside their minds. So what do they end up doing? Well! They are then participating in sex trafficking.

When men use pornography, in that process they are trained as tricks. Pornography is men’s rehearsal for prostitution. Source: “The Problem of Demand in Combating Sex Trafficking” by CAIRN INFO.

This above quote now takes us to the Erika Klein’s article “Human Sex Trafficking: Canada’s Hidden Crime”, which was published on The Mantle.

A booming black market industry, earning $32 billion dollars annually, more than the worth of Google, Starbucks and Nike combined. Human trafficking for the purposes of selling sexual acts, also known as sexual terrorism, is the use of illicit sex, violence and threats to intimidate or coerce to the state of fear and submission. It’s a problem worldwide, but it is becoming more widespread in North America, especially in Canada.

So you see why 2 out of 3 Canadians don’t know about sexual consent? So you see their future given that pornography and sex trafficking remain high in Canada?

Perhaps, it helps to know that Canada’s legal system itself is helping these causes. For example, the article “Why police dismiss 1 in 5 sexual assault claims as baseless” by Robyn Doolittle clearly state some flaws in the process used to handle sexual assault allegations.

Every year, an average of 5,500 people are reporting sexual violence to Canadian police, but their cases are dropping out of the system as unfounded long before a Crown prosecutor, judge or jury has a chance to weigh in.

The result is a game of chance for Canadian sex-assault complainants, whose odds of justice are determined not only by the facts of their case, but by where the crime took place, which police force picks up their file, and what officer shows up at their door.

Earlier in my blog, you must have read that I stated that Canada is actually one of the most dangerous countries to live in. Again, you can see why I think so.

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